Movies in More Languages

This has been the time of sadness, depression, fear and many other things with the Corona virus making its move everywhere, and we were left to spend time in the lock-down. Even though there were many relaxations provided, we didn’t have many changes in our life beyond lock-down. The situation doesn’t seem to be getting any better, and we surely need that vaccine sooner or later. Until then, we can go on with what we have, and watch more movies. There are so many movies coming up in different languages, and they are often better than what we usually watch, and some of them are really divergent, along with providing us the wonderful view of another land which we would also love to watch. The following is the list of languages in which I have watched movies and reviewed them for the first time during the Corona virus pandemic.

1. Romanian: As this post talks about movies in some new languages which I have come across only now, the first one is indeed Romanian. The case of Korean, Spanish, French, German and Chinese were already there, and I really wanted to watch a Romanian movie when I came across The Whistlers, a divergent crime thriller which took its deviation quite seriously, and ending up as an efficient one. One of the best foreign movies which I have watched in a long time, this one surely is a silent killer. From the land which we have known for being the setting for the home of Bram Stoker’s Dracula, it is only a matter of time before we wish to get more of the world in Romania.

Click here for The Whistlers Review

2. Vietnamese: The movie Furie, is a marital arts movie which makes us very much interested in a mother’s search for her daughter, reminding us of Taken, but providing an entirely different feeling. There are so many action sequences in this movie involving some on the top of a train, as we go with the mother to see her fight the criminals while making her way to the daughter. A movie from the beautiful nation in East Asia which could have been our destination, also has such wonderful visuals, not just of nature, but also of the city area. Earlier, we had come across Thai and Chinese movies which focused so much on martial arts, and this one will bring another level to the same.

Click here for Furie review

3. Latin: We haven’t heard much about Latin movies around here, and the only time when we hear about them is in some of the language related papers or when referring to the church. The First King is a movie that surely changes the same, because it takes you on a journey through the times just before the establishment of Ancient Rome which would go on to become a republic and later an empire which would control major areas of Europe and parts of Asia and Africa for centuries, and will have its legacy living on through the Byzantine Empire even though not based on Rome. The tale of two brother who were believed to have found Rome is told in a realistic way without exaggerations.

Click here for The First King review

4: Italian: The only Italian movie with colour I had watched before Piranhas was Life is Beautiful, an Oscar winning film with the setting of Second World War and the Jewish holocaust. Otherwise, I had watched Bicycle Thieves, the movie which was part of the Italian neo-realism. Piranhas deals with the youth taking these weapons into their hands, and leading gang wars in the streets there. You see the Italian streets, as beautiful as they are, and there is also a reflection of a violent new generation which is looking for easy money, and the lack of interest in education. This Italian movie did seem to have some elements from the past films being maintained around here too.

Click here for Piranhas Review

5. Russian and Polish: The first Russian movie on Movies of the Soul was Abigail, which was quickly followed by The Iron Mask: Mystery of the Dragon Seal. Both are some interesting fantasy movies, and the second one with a Chinese touch looks even more different. It was amazing to see the quality maintained there, and the movie Guests followed with some horror. The Balkan Line, a Serbian-Russian collaboration movie was also in the picture, and in that case too, we could feel the ability of Russian movies to rise up to Hollywood. There are actually some more Russian movies coming up from my side to prove the same. The Polish movie Diablo pretty good, but not that much as we had expected with a racing flick trying to be Fast and Furious.

Click here for The Iron Mask review

6. Dutch and Portuguese: The first movie I watched in Dutch language is Torpedo U-235, a movie set during the Second World War, as a group of unexpected soldiers move on to deliver uranium to the United States in a German u-boat. It has an interesting premise, and is entertaining, even though it could have been even better with better focus. The Portuguese movie from Brazil, Bacurau is a very divergent movie, which is not for everyone, but makes a special flick with the way it deals with its main idea. I will be coming with more movies in different languages, which are watched and reviewed less in this part of the world, because there are so many of them which need the opinions.

Click here for Bacurau review

***All the images used on this blog post were taken from the official Facebook pages of the movies and the actors or actresses performing in them.

TeNy

Never Say No to Cochin

Do you know that the Kochi-Muziris Biennale is going on right now? If you haven’t read about it, please check the information about the same on the website http://kochimuzirisbiennale.org/ – but I am pretty sure that there will be enough information about the same on most of the newspapers of India, and it is abundant on the newspapers of Kerala. For those who are not aware of the same, it will be there till the twenty nineth of March this year. Everybody needs to attend a biennale at least once.

A quote I found interesting during the Kochi Biennale :)

A quote I found interesting during the Kochi Biennale – on death by water 🙂

That would make people wonder if I am writing this from the location, and the answer is no. I haven’t been to this year’s Biennale. But I have been to the last festival which had its times during 2012-2013 and I have to admit that it was so well arranged, and impressively managed. So, is this post about that journey? No, this is more about Fort Cochin in general. I have been to the last Biennale and enjoyed it, and those four journeys to the Biennale were part of my multiple journeys to the place. Fort Cochin is a place which I have visited so many times.

Yes, you can also get captures like this during the Kochi Biennale ;)

Yes, you can also get captures like this during the Kochi Biennale – notice a jealous crow 😉

A journey to Fort Cochin shouldn’t be limited to one place. It should consist of four places – Fort Cochin, Mattanchery, Thoppumpady and Kumbalanghi, the last one being a tourist village and an island with so much of natural beauty – I certify the same. The second last one is on the way to Fort Cochin, and Saint Sebastian’s Church there, a heritage building and a famous religious structure, is worth your time, and you can also have a nice view of the lake from the back side of the building.

Santa Cruz Basilica - a structure that you wouldn't want to miss.

Santa Cruz Basilica – a structure that you wouldn’t want to miss at any cost.

Then, about Fort Cochin and Mattanchery – they can’t be seen separately. The latter has the Dutch Palace which I am yet to visit, and the Jew Street with the Jewish Synagogue which is India’s oldest functioning synagogue. It also has the Holy Cross Church where Church the Coonan Cross Oath took place where an oath was taken by the ancient Christians not to submit to the Portuguese and in the need to continue their culture and traditions. Mattanchery Jain Temple is another much visited destination.

Chinese fishing nets - always part of Cochin and its islands.

Chinese fishing nets – always part of Cochin and its islands, adding to its glory.

Coming back to Fort Cochin, one has to admit that there is no better place to conduct the Biennale considering how much of history this place has, and how much of colonial as well as some of the traditional Kerala culture can be witnessed on the streets of the town. There are the Chinese fishing nets as well as the buildings of its colonial past which form the major part of this end of the extended Cochin city. Given to the Portuguese by the King of Cochin in return for military aid, this place has been under Portuguese as well as Dutch occupation and finally coming under the British till independence.

A day at the beach - Kerala never forgets its football.

A day at the beach – Kerala never forgets its football, and neither does its soul.

Saint Francis Church remains a significant landmark as the oldest European church in India, originally built by the Portuguese, and where Vasco da Gama was buried. It comes under the Archaeological Survey of India and the Church of South India as of now. Santa Cruz Basilica originally built by the Portuguese which was destroyed by the British and was later re-built, remains another symbol of the area’s long history. You would love its Gothic interiors with some beautiful works.

The oldest European church in India - antiquity's own child.

The oldest European church in India; Saint Francis Church – antiquity’s own child.

Then there is the beach, where sometimes the love of football can be seen in full power, and some of the monuments as well as the remains of other few, including that of Fort Emmanuel. You can walk on the paved area or the beach itself and see those ships, boats as well as the Chinese fishing nets. You can also see some more churches, temples and mosques, as well as the Dutch Cemetery. There are some huge trees to add to the beauty and serenity of the already lovable world. When is the best time to visit? Right now, for there is Biennale going on!

The fishing boats with the old bridge of Cochin on the background.

The fishing boats of Cochin with the old bridge of the city on the background.

All photos were taken on my Sony Cybershot DSC-W310 during 2010-2012 period.

TeNy